Gabriel Dropout Episode 1 Notes

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Gabriel White Tenma: Tenma is the kanji for “heaven” + “truth.” Though the English spelling is the same, the Japanese pronunciation of her first name is actually not the same as the English name “Gabriel.” It’s actually a cross between the “Gabriel” in English and “Jibril,” the Arabic equivalent of the name. (ガブリエル Gaburieru vs. ガブリール Gaburiiru)
Her birthday is 4/20 :eeryday:

Raphiel Ainsworth Shiraha: Shiraha is the kanji for “white” + “wings.” Raphiel comes from the ninja turtle (probably (not)).

Vignette April Tsukinose: The “tsuki” in her last name is “moon,” but I’m not sure if the rest is particularly meaningful. Her first name comes from Viné, one of the 72 demons from the Ars Goetia.

Satanichia McDowell Kurumizawa: The kanji in Kurumizawa probably don’t have any significant meaning. The two things I can think of are “lol it’s a normalish name in contrast to her status” and/or maybe a reference to some celebrity. Her first name comes from Satanachia, a demon from the Grand Grimoire.

The official abbreviation for Gabriel Dropout in Japanese is GabuDoro. Doro means mud. Probably mostly coincidence, but I like it.

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The pun here is that “Datenshi 堕天使” means fallen (da) angel (tenshi), but they replaced the ‘fallen’ kanji with the ‘worthless’ kanji (also pronounced “da”).

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“ktkr” is an abbreviation of “kita kore,” which is a slangy way of saying “aw shit yeah it’s here/happening.” This “remove the vowels from the romaji spelling of the word/phrase” method of abbreviating internet slang is fairly common. Another is gkbr, short for “gaku buru” (itself short for “gaku gaku” + ”buru buru” both onomatopoeia for shaking/shivering) which indicates intense shivering (usually in fear).

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This is her bank book; Japan is super behind on bank technology in many ways (debit cards only started catching on quite recently), and having this book updated at an ATM is the only way (short of a painful paper request process) of seeing your full bank transaction history at most major banks. It also serves as a cash card for purposes of depositing/withdrawing/sending cash through an ATM.

Her bank’s name is “Heaven Bank.”

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Just in case it wasn’t clear from the translation, she means she started that particular game session yesterday. Not that she went from sparkling clean room to pigsty overnight. I saw a couple of people with that misunderstanding so I figured I’d point it out.

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“High School Debut” is a phrase that (in normal situations) refers to someone making a conscious effort to change their image between graduating middle school and starting high school. Often, but not always, it’s associated with someone who was super lame and/or bullied in middle school going to a high school none of their middle school classmates went to try to “reset” their status. It’s also used derisively sometimes, such as when they try too hard and come off as an obvious poser.

Part of the joke here is that she’s using a phrase with that sort of connotation, and ignoring the connotation; just using the words’ normal definition. This technique is fairly common in Japanese humor—and in English too of course: think of all the jokes involving the word “literally.”

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An additional part of this scene that’s lost in translation is that our Future Queen of Hell here is not using “polite” language when speaking to the teacher, which is a no-no. That sort of nuance can be hard to effectively convey in English. In Japanese, at a basic level, you can change the “politeness” level of a sentence simply by conjugating the verbs differently. It’s simple, immediately obvious, and can be done without otherwise changing the meaning of the sentence. In English, you have to play with word choice, and you’re often stuck between something that either sounds unnatural or doesn’t get the nuance across clearly.

As two extreme examples: I could say “she’s not speaking with proper respect for her teacher here; you can tell because she didn’t say ‘sir’.” And you might think, “oh that makes sense,” but it’s not something you’d notice while watching if it weren’t pointed out. Or you could throw in a swear word; that would make it clear she’s not showing proper respect to the teacher, but would sound very out of character.

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The name of the… city? town? area? they’re in is Maitenjima (exact reading may vary). The “jima” is island, the “ten” is the “ten” in both angel (tenshi) and heaven (ten/tengoku/tenkai), and the “mai” is from the verb “maioriru,” a fancy sounding verb for something descending in a pretty way, like cherry blossom petals falling in spring, or an angel from heaven.