Kobayashi’s Maid Dragon Ep 1 Notes

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The original phrase here is “choro-gon,” short for “choroi dragon.” “Choroi” is a word that means something is “simple” or “easy” to do, but recently it’s become especially common in anime/manga/etc. as describing a character who is easy to win over (e.g. with compliments, small gifts, etc.) or trick into doing things. In particular the portmanteau of choroi and heroine, “choroin,” has become popular to refer to (generally female) love interests who fall for the MC super easily, or tsundere type characters who act tough but give in at the slightest prodding.

A: “Nice lunch. Can I have a bite?”
B: “Screw off, get your own.”
A: “Alright, alright. I just wanted to try your home cooking…”
B: “F-Fine, you can have some! But only half!”
C (internally): Choroi…

As mentioned, it’s a very common phrase in anime/manga lately, and has show up in several shows this season already, so it’s good to know if you care about this sort of thing.

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The “tatsu” in Tatsunoguchi, the “ryu” in Sekiryu, and the “taki” in Takito all use a kanji that means “waterfall.” However, if you remove the water radical from them, they all mean
“dragon.”
滝→竜
瀧→龍

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This is a reference to a Japanese internet catchprase, “in Japanese is fine” (日本語でおk, nihongo de ok), that people use when someone types something nonsensical or with bad grammar. It’s kind of similar to “do you even English?”

It’s also common when people speak using a lot of loan words (i.e. not originally Japanese and written in katakana, like seen in this screenshot). This is especially common when talking about computer/programming stuff, like they are here, or BS “business jargon” type stuff. When you get too into that sort of lingo it can basically seem like you’re not even talking
Japanese anymore, especially to people not in that line of work. A lot of that applies to the same situation in English (i.e. to a non-programmer, a lot of that stuff sounds like technobabble), it just has the added layer of not even being from the same language.

This author’s works (Cool Kyoushinsha, which basically means “Follower of the Religion of Cool”) contain a lot of nerdy subculture stuff like this; you may be familiar with “I Can’t Understand What My Husband Is Saying,” another comic of theirs that got adapted and is the best exemplification of this.

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In addition to the coke-bottle glasses and sudden buck teeth, he also starts adding “-yansu” at the end of his sentences. It doesn’t actually mean anything in particular, but it’s associated with scrawny gag characters in old-timey manga because it sounds hella silly. It was originally a thing used by I believe primarily people in the merchant/artisan class a few hundred years ago (which is where it picked up a “subservient” sort of connotation, possibly).

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It’s very uncommon for Japanese households to have a dryer, so most clothes must be hung out to dry. If the weather is damp, rainy, overcast, etc., it takes forever for laundry to dry, which is a huge pain the butt (trust me).

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The Japanese language is fond of having set phrases for use in certain situations (spend a day in a Japanese office building and you’ll be so sick of hearing “yoroshiku onegai shimasu” and “otsukare-sama desu,” I swear to god kill me), but they tend to have several variations for changes in formality. For example here, Tohru is looking up different ways to say “welcome home.”

The most common way you’ll hear it is “okaeri” or “okaeri nasai.” The ways presented here are:
“Okaeri nasai mase.” The -mase indicates added politeness/respect and is commonly used towards customers by people working in retail, restaurants, etc. as (or maids).
“Okaeri de gozaru.” The -de gozaru ending also indicates added politeness/respect, but is obsolete in modern Japanese and generally associated with stuff like samurai, ninja, etc. (or
severe nerds trying to talk like them).
“Otsu otsu!” Otsu is short for “otsukare-sama desu,” which is generally something you say to people who are finishing/getting off work (though it’s become a sort of catch-all greeting between people on the job in a lot of cases). However, “otsu” itself is primarily associated with internet culture (2ch, niconico, online gaming, etc.), hence Kobayashi’s “where’d you get that?” reaction.